Paul and Peter H. Reynolds are GOING PLACES with new book


FableVision co-founders Paul and Peter H. Reynolds are celebrating their first picture book collaboration with the release of Going Places.

Described by Kirkus Reviews as “an ode to creativity and individuality,” the story is a modern fable for all ages. Going Places, published by Simon & Schuster’s Atheneum Booksserves as a call to evolve our educational system from one that too often relies on prepackaged content and one-dimensional assessments to one that encourages critical thinking and creativity.

“We are long-time champions of creativity in teaching and learning,” Paul Reynolds said.

Going Places features two elementary school students who participate in a school-wide go-cart building and racing contest. Each student grabs an identical kit, including Raphael who sets out to follow the instructions provided to build his vehicle. But Maya is inspired by things in motion and nature. She decides to invent an entirely different kind of vehicle.

Publishers Weekly says, “While the message about outside-the-box thinking is impossible to miss, the book is also an observation about how opposite temperaments can lead to successful collaborations. Maya is a strong figure; Rafael’s view of her over the fence as she experiments with a set of geared wings and pedals is an encouraging vision of the ‘maker’ child who prefers crafting things herself to watching them on a screen.”

Going Places is based on an original, animated film called Above and Beyond, which was produced by FableVision Studios with The Partnership for 21st Century Skills.  The four most important skills identified by the group are known as the “4Cs” – communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. These skills are cited by industry as fundamental to innovation and invention, and essential skills for all employees.

Signed and personalized copies of Going Places can also be ordered online through 

Praise for Going Places:

“While the message about outside-the-box thinking is impossible to miss, the book is also an observation about how opposite temperaments can lead to successful collaborations . . .an encouraging vision of the “maker” child who prefers crafting things herself to watching them on a screen.” – Publishers Weekly

“Inspires can-do attitude combining imagination, invention, and engineering.” – ALA Booklist

“Captures the discovery of new ideas, teamwork, and the joys of creating. A fun story that will get kids thinking (maybe even outside the box).” – School Library Journal

“An ode to creativity and individuality,” – Kirkus Reviews

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